Blephilia ciliata, Downy Wood Mint New for 2019!

Blephilia ciliata, Downy Wood Mint New for 2019!
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  • Item #: PP7
  • Attractive Flowers:
  • Average - Dry soil:
  • Average well drained soil:
  • Beneficial Insects:
  • Butterflies:
  • Clay Soil- High clay content, fine texture:
  • Cut Flower:
  • Deer Resistant:
  • Drought tolerant:
  • Drought Tolerant:
  • Dry-Moist Soil:
  • Erosion Control:
  • Fragrant:
  • Full - Part Sun (6+ hours of sun):
  • Groundcover:
  • High Wildlife Value:
  • Hummingbirds:
  • Loamy Soil- mostly silt, sand, some clay:
  • Native to Coastal Regions:
  • Native To Mountain Regions:
  • Native to Piedmont Regions:
  • Organic soil- high level of decayed leaves, bark:
  • Perennial:
  • Pollinator support:
  • Sandy soil, coarse texture:
  • UPL- Almost never occur in wetlands:
  • Wildflower:
  • Full Sun:
  * Marked fields are required.
Qty*
Price $6.00
5 or more $3.50 each
20 or more $2.00 each
50 or more $1.10 each
100 or more $0.90 each
Availability In-Stock
Native Range: Eastern United States
Zone: 4 to 8
Height: 1.00 to 2.50 feet
Spread: 0.75 to 1.50 feet
Bloom Time: May to August
Bloom Description: Blue, purple
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Dry to medium
Maintenance: Medium
Flower: Showy
Tolerate: Drought, Dry Soil
 

Culture

Best grown in average, dry to medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Blephilia ciliata, commonly called Ohio horsemint,occurs in dryish open woods and thickets, clearings, fields and roadsides.  A clump-forming, mint family member that features mostly unbranched, square stems which rise to 30" tall. Blue-purple, two-lipped flowers appear in late spring to mid-summer in several tiered, whorled, globular clusters in an interrupted terminal spike, with each cluster being subtended by (resting upon) a whorl of fringed bracts. Similar in appearance to the closely related monardas. Lanceolate stem leaves are sessile, lightly-toothed, whitish-downy below and mildly fragrant when crushed. Leaves are usually considered to be lacking in the pungency and quality needed for use as a culinary herb. Small basal leaves and shoots remain green throughout the winter.

Genus name comes from the Greek blepharis meaning an eyelash for the bracts being fringed by hairs.